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Policy Positions & Sign-On Letters

Learn more about the principles and priorities that guide AAPD’s policy positions and view sign-on letters that we’ve supported.

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Principles and Policy Priorities

Principle 1: Community Integration

People with disabilities have the right to live independently in the community in the most integrated setting of their choice.

Community Integration policy priorities:
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that ensure people with disabilities have access to affordable home and community based long-term services and supports that enable people to be integrated into the community, including the expansion of the availability of home and community based services to end the institutional bias in the Medicaid program;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies to ensure people with disabilities have access to affordable accessible housing, including non-provider owned scattered site housing, and will advocate against the use of institutional or congregate “clustered” models that segregate people with disabilities from their communities;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that ensure that people with disabilities have access to accessible and affordable transportation; and
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that promote the development of universally designed technology, and that ensure affordable access to that technology, to support people with disabilities to live independently.

 

Principle 2: Equal Opportunity and Economic Self-Sufficiency

People with disabilities have the right to equal opportunity, to be economically self-sufficient, and to earn and save without jeopardizing access to the services and supports that allow them to live and work independently.

Equal Opportunity and Economic Self-Sufficiency policy priorities:
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that support individuals with disabilities to work in integrated competitive settings in which they are paid competitive wages and for policies that end segregated subminimum wage work;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that provide individuals with disabilities the opportunities to earn and save without losing access to services and supports through expansion of employment based services, including supported and customized employment, and improving Medicaid Buy In and other Medicaid options that provide access to home and community based services;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that improve and enhance inclusive workplaces in both the public and private sectors; and
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that provide young people with disabilities opportunities to achieve economic independence, including through education, internships, and mentoring.

 

Principle 3: Equal Rights and Political Participation

Discrimination against people with disabilities that produces barriers to community integration, independent living, equal opportunity, economic self-sufficiency, and political and civic participation must be eliminated. Strong civil rights laws and enforcement of those laws are essential to ending discrimination.

Equal Rights and Political Participation policy priorities:
  • AAPD will advocate for strong enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act, and other laws that guarantee the rights and full participation of people with disabilities and for improvements in those laws when necessary;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that allow people with disabilities to fully participate in the political process, including ensuring the accessibility of polling locations and through promoting the availability of accessible voting technology; and
  • AAPD will promote the ideals of the Americans with Disabilities Act around the world to increase the ability of individuals with disabilities to travel, work, and live abroad.

 

Principle 4:  People with disabilities have a right to Quality, Comprehensive, Affordable Health Care

Health Care policy priorities:
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that ensure people with disabilities have access to quality, affordable, and comprehensive health care;
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that ensure that individuals with disabilities have control over their health care decisions through the promotion of individual choice, person centered planning, and consumer self-direction; and
  • AAPD will advocate for policies that ensure the accessibility of health care facilities and medical devices and equipment.

 

2017 Sign-On Letters

  • Opposition to H.R. 1313, Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act (3/8/2017)
    Members of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities oppose H.R. 1313 as it seeks to eliminate protections Congress provided with respect to employer-sponsored wellness programs in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).
  • Keep ESSA Implementation Moving Forward – Oppose H.J. Res. 57 (3/3/2017)
    46 civil rights organizations urge the US Senate to support continued implementation of the bipartisan Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).
  • Stop Taxing Death and Disability Act Support Letter (2/15/2017)
    AAPD joined with the Consortium of Citizens with Disabilities (CCD) on a letter supporting the Stop Taxing Death and Disability Act, which would no longer treat student loan discharges on the basis of total and permanent disability as income for tax purposes.
  • Letter Expressing Continued Concern about Sessions Nomination (1/30/2017)
    214 civil and human rights organizations express profound concerns about a number of President Trump’s recent executive orders and policy statements and their connection to the nomination of Senator Jeff Sessions as Attorney General.
  • CCD Letter to the US Senate Opposing the Budget Resolution (1/9/2017)
    The Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD) opposes the Budget Resolution because it seeks to eliminate access to affordable, accessible and comprehensive health care services in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).
  • Amicus Brief, ADA Title II (1/4/2017)
    The United States filed this action to challenge the State of Georgia’s practice of unnecessarily segregating students with behavior-related disabilities in separate schools or classrooms in violation of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

 

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